Fortingall Yew Tree

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The Fortingall Yew Tree is situated 38 miles northwest of Perth, 8 miles west of Aberfeldy.

This Tree is claimed to be the oldest in Britain, between 2,000 and 5,000 years, maybe even 9,000 years old.

The Tree can be visited all year Free of charge. Postcode: PH15 2LL

Fortingall Map Large Images

See also a large Click On Map for Top Attractions in the area.

The Image top is of the very small village of Fortingall with a number of Thatched houses.



The second image shows Fortingall Church with the Yew Tree to the left. Large Image.

The third image shows the Enclosure around the Tree.

Fortingall History

Ancient Times - Pagans were said to have lit fires at the base of the Fortingall Yew for religious ceremonies.

1300s - Fortingall Village was ravaged by the Black Death. A Standing Stone in the field opposite the Hotel is referred to as the Cairn of the Dead, said to mark the site of a mass grave.

1700s - the Old Church is built at Fortingall. The Belfry of that Church can be seen in the Graveyard.

1700s - the Fortingall Yew was said to be 52 feet / 16m around at the base.

1785 - an enclosure was erected to try and prevent people from damaging the tree.

1833 - records state large branches and parts of the trunk had been taken by people to be used for making household goods.

The main trunk has since decayed, leaving what looks like several smaller trees growing together.

1885 - the shipping magnate Sir Donald Currie acquired Glen Lyon Estate and the Village of Fortingall.

1890 - Currie had Fortingall Village re-modeled and re-built to designs of the architect James MacLaren.

The re-modeling of the Village included a number of Thatched houses. The Hotel was also built at that time.

1902 - the present day Fortingall Parish Church was completed next to the Yew Tree.

The Royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh are to use clippings from the Fortingall Yew to plant a mile-long hedge, to try and maintain the DNA of this ancient specimen.

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Fortingall Yew Tree Photos